To Serve

I was praying about a lot of things while I was drifting off to sleep last night. Heavy things, light things, confusing things. All matter of things. And during my rambling prayers, the following thought popped into my head:

I didn’t come to be served, but to serve.

I believe the Holy Spirit was reminding me of Matthew 20:28, which says,

For even the Son of Man came not to be served
but to serve others and to give his life as a ransom for many.

God didn’t come to Earth to be served. Isn’t that incredible? He came to serve us. The King James Version uses the word “ministered”. He came not to be ministered to, but to minister to us.

Who else is like this? To not seek self in every little thing, but to put others first…even if you’re the one who deserves to be first.

What other God is like this?

In a powerful coupling, John 3:17 says,

God sent his Son into the world not to judge the world, but to save the world through him.

I feel like I’m getting to know Jesus on a whole new level lately. He came to earth to become like us, to experience our world with its hurts and pains. But he didn’t come to judge us on how we would handle the pain. And he didn’t come to be doted on.

He came to serve us, minister to us, and redeem us.

Personal, present needs.

Luke prays for us every morning before work. It was a habit that was forced into practice by our mentors when we were going through a rough patch in our marriage a couple years ago. It was hard to start, but it’s become a part of our morning routine that we both continue to show up for.

This morning, after praying for my day, Luke asked Jesus to help him and his coworkers with a difficult project. I was immediately inspired, and followed up with praying for focus and organization for my projects as well.

It was actually a really powerful time of prayer for me, despite the fact that it was all of about five minutes. I realized that I spend a lot of my time praying for the big picture stuff, like health and provision and God’s will to be done. But I don’t spend time in the details. But the details is where I need him most.

Earlier this week I read the following passage in the gospel of John, chapter 2:

The next day there was a wedding celebration in the village of Cana in Galilee. Jesus’ mother was there, and Jesus and his disciples were also invited to the celebration. The wine supply ran out during the festivities, so Jesus’ mother told him, “They have no more wine.”

“Dear woman, that’s not our problem,” Jesus replied. “My time has not yet come.”

But his mother told the servants, “Do whatever he tells you.”

Standing nearby were six stone water jars, used for Jewish ceremonial washing. Each could hold twenty to thirty gallons. Jesus told the servants, “Fill the jars with water.” When the jars had been filled, he said, “Now dip some out, and take it to the master of ceremonies.” So the servants followed his instructions.

When the master of ceremonies tasted the water that was now wine, not knowing where it had come from (though, of course, the servants knew), he called the bridegroom over. 10 “A host always serves the best wine first,” he said. “Then, when everyone has had a lot to drink, he brings out the less expensive wine. But you have kept the best until now!”

11 This miraculous sign at Cana in Galilee was the first time Jesus revealed his glory. And his disciples believed in him.

When I read this passage, what stuck out to me was that Jesus didn’t have to turn this water into wine, and he expressed as much to his mom. But he did it anyway. In my study bible, it mentioned that weddings during this time were week long celebrations, and for them to run out of wine would be a huge embarrassment. So in essence, this was a culture problem. A personal issue. Not a problem of biblical proportions. But do you see what Jesus did? He turned the water into wine. The best wine. He may have saved the entire celebration!

This was the first time he revealed his glory, and it was personal. It was a present need. I love that.

I’m very inspired this morning to bring my personal, present needs to Jesus.

Resources:
New Living Translation Bible
NLT Life Application Study Bible

Are you looking for wisdom?

First Corinthians starts talking about wisdom in verse 18, all the way through chapter two and maybe into chapter three as well. But the verse I can’t move past is chapter 1 verse 21, which says:

God in his wisdom saw to it that the world would never know him through human wisdom.

It has me thinking of examples of human wisdom versus God’s wisdom.

Human wisdom says that the only way to have enough energy for my day is to get as much sleep as possible and have a perfectly balanced routine. But godly wisdom says it starts by first abiding in Him. For we do not live off of bread alone, but by every word that comes from the Lord. (Luke 4:4)

Human wisdom says that to find fulfillment and purpose, I need to make things happen, doing everything in my power to make a name for myself. But God says that selfish ambition leads to evil of every kind, and that we must instead serve one another. (James 3:15-16, Matthew 23:11)

And how do we gain salvation? Not through daring feats, wondrous acts or perfect behavior….but by surrender.

We don’t find wisdom by looking at our own understanding of how the world works. We find it by looking to God and trusting his Word.

The message of the cross is foolish to those who are headed for destruction! But we who are being saved know it is the very power of God. – 1 Corinthians 1:18 NLT